Review of the Springfield M1A

There are a lot of gun enthusiasts these days, combing the Internet for handguns and Assault Rifles For Sale. They are looking for the best weapons that can be used for survival, home defense, hunting, and a multitude of other uses. One of the guns that fits the bill and should definitely be considered is the Springfield M1A. Below you will find a review of this assault rifle and what you can expect from it.

Springfield m1aThe M1A is chambered in .308 Winchester which is the same as 7.62 NATO. This rifle is the civilian version of the M14, which once was the standard issue for the US military and is still used in some applications today.During the Vietnam era the M14 was replaced by the lighter, smaller M16 but it wasn’t a willful transition for many troops. The M14 is a great rifle and is known to be very reliable and accurate.

Many people who are looking for Assault Rifles for Sale want to know what the difference is between the M1A and the M14. The biggest thing that makes them different are the features that the M14 has that the M1A doesn’t have, such as the full-auto option and the bayonet stud.

The features that this rifle does have include the military trigger which is two-stage and that sets off its action using a 5 to 6 pound pull. It also has adjustable military sights which you can adjust for elevation and windage. Also, when you choose the Standard version, it comes with a synthetic or walnut stock. If you choose a synthetic stock, it is available with two finishes: matte black or mossy oak.

The M1A is a great rifle and you can buy it directly from Springfield or check gunbroker and you might be able to find a used one for a good deal. If your interested in building your own assault rifle check out this page.

History & Facts of The Springfield M1A

Springfield m1aThe Springfield M1A is simply just the civilian version of the M14 service rifle much like the AR-15 is the civilian version of the M16/M4 family of rifles.

The M14 and the Springfield M1A are very similar but there minor differences to take note of including…

M14 / Springfield M1A Differences:

-There are some differences in the receivers, the M1A is made from a cast steel alloy while the M14 receivers were drop forged.
-The M1A fires single shot semi-automatic while the M14 is select fire automatic
-The stock of the M14 has a cutout for the auto selector switch that is not included or necessary on the M1A. You can however find older models that still have the cutout
-The post assault weapons ban M1A rifles do not have a bayonet lug

The primary difference between the two weapon systems is that the Springfield M1A does not fire on full auto. I don’t look at this as a bad thing at all. Yeah, it sucks that the government is able to limit us on our options but to be totally honest, you don’t need or in most cases even want full auto fire in combat situation.

Everyone has their own reasons for owning guns… some people just think they are cool, some have them for protection, some are collectors, and others are hunters. So while it is fun to fire weapons on full auto, it is entirely impractical in most combat situations. And yes – I do have experience here.

Moving on…

The Springfield M1A is a shoulder fired, Magazine feed, gas operated, rotating bolt semi-automatic weapon. The rifle fires 7.62x51mm NATO ammunition which is essentially .308 Winchester.

Today, the Springfield M1A can be purchased for about $1,500 but prices can vary greatly depending on the condition and what features it has.

There are numerous variations  of the rifle that you can buy including the traditional standard M1A to the weapons built for more modern tactical applications. Some of Springfield’s modern tactical rifles include features such as the picatinny rail system for mounting optics, lasers, and lights as well as shorter barrels and modified gas systems for a flatter, more stable shooting platform.

Where to buy a Springfield M1A

Whatever rifle you decide on be sure to do a little shopping around before you lay down your cash. As I said, prices can very so it’s worth it to do you due diligence here. I always start with my local dealers first even though I can usually find what I want for cheaper online. But sometimes I’m pleasantly surprised and I can avoid paying transfer fees. Double whammy!

If you don’t have any luck finding a Springfield M1A with your local dealers I would check gunbroker.com or cheaperthandirt.com. These sites have served me well and provided me with excellent service.